Road Trip 2011 – Niland, Slab City, Salton Sea and Joshua Tree National Park CA – Day 79 – Part 1

I first heard about Slab City when I happened upon a website full of photos by photographer Claire Martin – who spent quite a bit of time in the community documenting the people there.  So, I made sure to put it on our route and was excited to visit.

From the website Light Journeys:

Slab City has been created by a small but committed community of squatters in the Colorado Desert of South Eastern California, USA. Taking its name from the concrete slabs that remain from an abandoned World War II base, it is a tragic yet romantic landscape that commands its residents to possess the same balance of beauty and beast. Unbearable temperature highs in summer weed out the many who inhabit the free space in winter leaving only the most resilient, or the most unfortunate, as permanent residents. These same people maintain the ad-hoc infrastructure that makes it such a desirable community to visit in the cooler months. Those who stay year after year could be described as poverty stricken; living in some of the worst conditions in America. Some residents would tell you this is the truth. Others fiercely defend their lifestyle as a deliberate choice of rejecting mainstream society. For these people Slab City provides a freedom they’d never experienced before. There are others who were forced here through circumstance; society won’t tolerate them due to their pasts as felons, addicts or vagrants, but who wholeheartedly embrace the opportunity to live in a community that won’t judge them. Slab City is a place for the broken and desperate and for the fierce defenders of freedom from tyranny. But more than anything else, it is what this small group of people call home.

Just outside the entrance to Slab City is Salvation Mountain… made of plaster, hay, sticks, and lots and lots and lots of paint.


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